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FBI Arrests Coaches in Corruption Scandal

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29 minutes ago, Indykev said:

 

I am pretty sure I saw where Auburn is now being looked at for someone taking a test for one of their football players.  I think the hole athletic program at Auburn should be shut down.

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Just now, IU Scott said:

I am pretty sure I saw where Auburn is now being looked at for someone taking a test for one of their football players.  I think the whole athletic program at Auburn should be shut down.

 

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2 hours ago, jimsorgi said:

It's hard to say this is very meaningful. FBI just responded to a FOIA request and said they can't turn over Kansas-related documents. Yes, as the article contends, that implies there is at least some mention of Kansas in at least one document. But that's pretty meaningless - of course Adidas had documents that relate to Kansas (like, for instance, the contract between Kansas and Adidas). There could be more, for sure, but the FOIA response in reality tells us nothing. I'd fully expect to see the same response if someone requested documents that mention IU.

That makes me almost wish someone would make a FOIA request related to IU just to get a sense of whether or not IU athletics are on the same level as Kansas athletics.  The only telling response would be "we have no documents related to this request."

Wouldn't that be sweet news to go into the weekend with?  Doyel or someone, come on...make a FOIA request!

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3 hours ago, jimsorgi said:

I agree with you - but the point is that it's easy in hindsight to say that it was a poor guideline. Strict guidelines always work great, until there's a situation where they don't work. That same idea applies to Pitino. What guideline covers prostitution? Probably the improper benefits? In which case, it's the dollar value of the improper benefits, which generally seems like a reasonable way to determine level of punishment, except that prostitution feels like it should be punished far more harshly than buying a kid a handful of meals. It's inevitable that you'll have unanticipated consequences with guidelines, and, while the NCAA should certainly endeavor to foresee and account for unexpected situations, it's not a total failure if they run into them.

You're right that NCAA probably needs to simplify and change some of the guidelines (and it certainly never hurts to take a close review of them), but your point about revamping investigation is the more critical one. NCAA's issues are far, far more a failure of enforcement than of legislation (except to the extent that legislation allows or restricts enforcement). Writing new guidelines, by itself, will do little to address the issues, I think, and is very much a secondary issue.

Good post.  And your point is well taken regarding guidelines.  I am not a criminal lawyer.  But I am sure we could find plenty of examples of someone holding a bag of weed getting something absurd like 20 years while someone who harmed someone else as in a rape or the like got 15.  I don't want to keep harping on it, so I will leave it at this.  I don't think the NCAA's policies are well thought out.  Even if guidelines are inherently not perfect, I think there is room for improvement in whatever the NCAA has been using.

Back on my general feelings, we don't want corruption in this country.  That's why the FBI inserted themselves here.  But my overwhelming feeling is that the NCAA looks the other way and deflects with a shrug as if to say, "hey, we don't have subpoena power, what can we do?"  I don't buy into that whole approach.  You can't enforce what you don't find, and that's how it appears that they handle business.  Protect immediate $$ interest rather than a focus on integrity.  That's where the Cleveland State jokes come from.  It's funny because disillusioned fans understand the failings in the current system..  I'd submit they will have a stronger game if they take on corruption head on.  As I started this paragraph, as a country, we do not want corruption.  This isn't a banana republic.  Be above board.

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6 minutes ago, Danomatic said:

Apologies, I didn’t read the previous page in regards to the KU involvement. 

No problemo, Dano.  Love the fact that you are here.  YOU should be posting more.  Always love to hear from you.  

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9 hours ago, jimsorgi said:

I agree with a lot of what you said, but it isn't all black and white and simple to fix.

For instance, this part of your post: the NCAA does already have uniformity in eligibility issues due to receipt of improper benefits. Keep in mind that no one was punished for buying a bumper sticker - the punishment was for provider improper benefits to a prospective student athlete. Based on the dollar value of those benefits, NCAA guidelines required a 10 game suspension.

The reason they were considered improper benefits is because the guardian was considered a booster, and the reason he was considered a booster was because of the bumper sticker purchase. The NCAA's definition of booster includes this. We can argue now that it's a ridiculous definition, but at the time the NCAA created the definition no one had a problem with it.

So this is all a case of a situation in which NCAA has clear guidelines and followed those clear guidelines - even though the result was probably disproportionately harsh. Any time you have clear and strict guidelines, you'll get results like this at some point.

I think the issue is that Adams was their guardian. I highly doubt the NCAA has rules differentiating a legal guardian and a parent, so it kinda makes it a moot point that he was a booster. It is a bad rule, but I am of the belief that it wasn't properly enforced. 

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6 hours ago, milehiiu said:

No problemo, Dano.  Love the fact that you are here.  YOU should be posting more.  Always love to hear from you.  

I try to check in at least once a day, just to keep up! 😂

6 hours ago, milehiiu said:

No problemo, Dano.  Love the fact that you are here.  YOU should be posting more.  Always love to hear from you.  

 

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18 hours ago, BobSaccamanno said:

Good post.  And your point is well taken regarding guidelines.  I am not a criminal lawyer.  But I am sure we could find plenty of examples of someone holding a bag of weed getting something absurd like 20 years while someone who harmed someone else as in a rape or the like got 15.  I don't want to keep harping on it, so I will leave it at this.  I don't think the NCAA's policies are well thought out.  Even if guidelines are inherently not perfect, I think there is room for improvement in whatever the NCAA has been using.

Back on my general feelings, we don't want corruption in this country.  That's why the FBI inserted themselves here.  But my overwhelming feeling is that the NCAA looks the other way and deflects with a shrug as if to say, "hey, we don't have subpoena power, what can we do?"  I don't buy into that whole approach.  You can't enforce what you don't find, and that's how it appears that they handle business.  Protect immediate $$ interest rather than a focus on integrity.  That's where the Cleveland State jokes come from.  It's funny because disillusioned fans understand the failings in the current system..  I'd submit they will have a stronger game if they take on corruption head on.  As I started this paragraph, as a country, we do not want corruption.  This isn't a banana republic.  Be above board.

Good thoughts - I definitely agree.

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20 minutes ago, BGleas said:

Dickie V is seriously one of the biggest frauds in sports...Now defending Rick Pitino. 

 

Dickie V is all about the Brotherhood. And yes, he's kind of a fraud. The lie detector comment is a joke.

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Just now, Hoosierhoopster said:

Dickie V is all about the Brotherhood. And yes, he's kind of a fraud. The lie detector comment is a joke.

Yup, he actually went on about a 6-7 tweet rant about how Louisville rushed to judgement on Pitino, completely leaving out that this is like his 3rd scandal. 

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36 minutes ago, Coach1K said:

 

If 28 different schools are conducting internal reviews, then I ask.... what does that tell you ? 

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8 minutes ago, milehiiu said:

If 28 different schools are conducting internal reviews, then I ask.... what does that tell you ? 

I would say that there are things that those 28 schools are hiding and don't want anyone to know be it the incompetent NCAA or the federal government(FBI). 

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20 minutes ago, Coach1K said:

I would say that there are things that those 28 schools are hiding and don't want anyone to know be it the incompetent NCAA or the federal government(FBI). 

It could also be the prudent thing to do.  Isn't it the duty of the university to make sure that this kind of thing has not happened at their institution but if it has, to correct it?  If I were a college or university, I wouldn't try to hide from the FBI.  It's very unlikely work, and the more likely result would be jail time for those involved. 

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Fred Glass was on the radio last week and said President McRobbie called him in to make sure IU has not done anything wrong.  Each program needs to have some internal meetings to make sure everything is on the up and up and don't have nay problems.

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5 minutes ago, slojoe said:

It could also be the prudent thing to do.  Isn't it the duty of the university to make sure that this kind of thing has not happened at their institution but if it has, to correct it?  If I were a college or university, I wouldn't try to hide from the FBI.  It's very unlikely work, and the more likely result would be jail time for those involved. 

Agree. I don't think internal reviews in this situation are any admittance of guilt, they're just SOP to do your due diligence to make sure you're school isn't involved. 

I'd be surprised if IU doesn't do an internal review. 

Edited by BGleas

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