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Picture of Ayden celebrating his last day of Elementary school.  For those of you that have been around here long enough know that at 2 or 3 years old doctors were telling us that if Ayden survived he

Yesterday we were so.bleseed to celebrate the graduation of my oldest son from college.  He graduated in 3 years,  played baseball and graduated with honors. 3.75 GPA and starts Grad school to become

Taking another opportunity to honor my HERO. today Ayden received his diploma from his principal,  asst principal and all the 6th grade teachers. They are going to personally deliver them to every stu

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Obviously a tragic story.  But, if a child with a seizure from a high fever caused by any other illness had died in the same way, it would be counted as a drowning.  Another important piece of the puzzle that was not addressed in the written story is why a very sick child was left unattended in the bathtub.  

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/the-7-year-old-georgia-boy-with-covid-19-who-died-drowned-in-a-bathtub-after-a-seizure-coroner-says/ar-BB17NSUu?ocid=uxbndlbing

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What has been interesting to me is the massive realignment caused / accelerated by Covid. I think we are still in the very early stages. Families and businesses have totally changed their behaviors. I have commented before on the exodus from cities. https://nypost.com/2020/08/11/new-yorkers-flee-nyc-in-droves/. People are saving more, living more conservatively. Backyard pools and RVs are more popular. Businesses are being reworked with employees working virtually and moving supply lines closer. Methods of teaching are being reworked. Some trends, like online shopping, are just being accelerated. Retail bankruptcies will continue. Add to that many restaurants. Vaccine process went from 5 years to 6 months. The world is changing. The pace of change has accelerated. Drive in movies have went from nearly extinct to in demand once again. 

What changes have you noticed and which are here to stay?

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18 minutes ago, Reacher said:

What has been interesting to me is the massive realignment caused / accelerated by Covid. I think we are still in the very early stages. Families and businesses have totally changed their behaviors. I have commented before on the exodus from cities. https://nypost.com/2020/08/11/new-yorkers-flee-nyc-in-droves/. People are saving more, living more conservatively. Backyard pools and RVs are more popular. Businesses are being reworked with employees working virtually and moving supply lines closer. Methods of teaching are being reworked. Some trends, like online shopping, are just being accelerated. Retail bankruptcies will continue. Add to that many restaurants. Vaccine process went from 5 years to 6 months. The world is changing. The pace of change has accelerated. Drive in movies have went from nearly extinct to in demand once again. 

What changes have you noticed and which are here to stay?

I think a lot more people will be working remotely for years to come.  I also think NYC is dead.  

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42 minutes ago, Reacher said:

What has been interesting to me is the massive realignment caused / accelerated by Covid. I think we are still in the very early stages. Families and businesses have totally changed their behaviors. I have commented before on the exodus from cities. https://nypost.com/2020/08/11/new-yorkers-flee-nyc-in-droves/. People are saving more, living more conservatively. Backyard pools and RVs are more popular. Businesses are being reworked with employees working virtually and moving supply lines closer. Methods of teaching are being reworked. Some trends, like online shopping, are just being accelerated. Retail bankruptcies will continue. Add to that many restaurants. Vaccine process went from 5 years to 6 months. The world is changing. The pace of change has accelerated. Drive in movies have went from nearly extinct to in demand once again. 

What changes have you noticed and which are here to stay?

I don't think it is just NYC...I believe most large cities will have a large exodus of people fleeing to the suburbs/country. Especially as more businesses realize they can cut costs by having more employees work remotely.

Online, online, online...many retail businesses are going to have to figure out how to transition from brick and mortar to online or will risk bankruptcy. More grocery stores will offer delivery services to meet customers needs. Restaurants will continue to struggle as more people cook from home or depend on pickup/delivery options. More schools and colleges/universities will offer online courses.

Handshakes could be a thing of the past.

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35 minutes ago, Reacher said:

What has been interesting to me is the massive realignment caused / accelerated by Covid. I think we are still in the very early stages. Families and businesses have totally changed their behaviors. I have commented before on the exodus from cities. https://nypost.com/2020/08/11/new-yorkers-flee-nyc-in-droves/. People are saving more, living more conservatively. Backyard pools and RVs are more popular. Businesses are being reworked with employees working virtually and moving supply lines closer. Methods of teaching are being reworked. Some trends, like online shopping, are just being accelerated. Retail bankruptcies will continue. Add to that many restaurants. Vaccine process went from 5 years to 6 months. The world is changing. The pace of change has accelerated. Drive in movies have went from nearly extinct to in demand once again. 

What changes have you noticed and which are here to stay?

I was talking to an airline pilot this weekend and (separately) my parents neighbor who works for a parts supplier in the airline industry...there's some big obstacles on the horizon. Bottom line is planes need to be flown and right now many of them are parked. While parked rust settles, parts go bad, hinges lose lubrication, etc. You simply can't fly a plane that has been parked for a month; it's horribly unsafe. 

Thus, when travel picks up airlines are fearing that they won't be able to meet demand. The neighbor who works for a parts supplier said that his company has been contracted to increase production of the replacement parts that will inevitably be needed. However, they are refusing to do so because the airlines can't pay them up front and the suppliers simply can't afford to hold inventory for an undetermined amount of time. Basically what he thinks this means is....suppliers are going to wait on a federal bailout because it's guaranteed payment. 

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54 minutes ago, Reacher said:

What has been interesting to me is the massive realignment caused / accelerated by Covid. I think we are still in the very early stages. Families and businesses have totally changed their behaviors. I have commented before on the exodus from cities. https://nypost.com/2020/08/11/new-yorkers-flee-nyc-in-droves/. People are saving more, living more conservatively. Backyard pools and RVs are more popular. Businesses are being reworked with employees working virtually and moving supply lines closer. Methods of teaching are being reworked. Some trends, like online shopping, are just being accelerated. Retail bankruptcies will continue. Add to that many restaurants. Vaccine process went from 5 years to 6 months. The world is changing. The pace of change has accelerated. Drive in movies have went from nearly extinct to in demand once again. 

What changes have you noticed and which are here to stay?

I can only give a couple examples.

Downtown Indy will probably snap back quicker than most large cities because of convention business and honestly....we've spent decades to get this city where it's at. Right now though you have panhandlers, addicts, homeless all walking around. I don't go downtown Indy anymore until this nonsense ends.

Regarding a city like Chicago. Very good friend from IU is commercial real estate broker for one of the big boys. He's expecting by end of the year at least 1/3 of jobs (at his employer)  lost because so many businesses are either forcing their way out of leases, not paying, cancelling altogether,etc....I haven't lived there in decades but will always have a love for Chicago. I'm very nervous what's ahead for them. 

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1 hour ago, Reacher said:

What has been interesting to me is the massive realignment caused / accelerated by Covid. I think we are still in the very early stages. Families and businesses have totally changed their behaviors. I have commented before on the exodus from cities. https://nypost.com/2020/08/11/new-yorkers-flee-nyc-in-droves/. People are saving more, living more conservatively. Backyard pools and RVs are more popular. Businesses are being reworked with employees working virtually and moving supply lines closer. Methods of teaching are being reworked. Some trends, like online shopping, are just being accelerated. Retail bankruptcies will continue. Add to that many restaurants. Vaccine process went from 5 years to 6 months. The world is changing. The pace of change has accelerated. Drive in movies have went from nearly extinct to in demand once again. 

What changes have you noticed and which are here to stay?

I think there will be significant and lasting changes, especially the acceleration of online shopping and working from home. We've both been working remotely since March 13th and it's fine. I have roughly 50 people in my group and we've adjusted well. I just can't imagine wasting time walking to the subway stop and commuting into Manhattan anymore - and then doing the same thing on the way home. It's just a waste of time.

Big chains are fleeing NYC (good riddance!) and we are losing lots of smaller places/independent shops. But, some independently owned restaurants/bars/shops here are flexing to meet this new reality. Not sure if it's enough to keep them going, but life is moving on here in Brooklyn. Is it different? Yeah, but things do change.

I know there are articles about people fleeing the city, but I honestly do not know a single person who is leaving the city permanently. Not a one. Many of us are actually hoping that rents/real estate prices fall - that's not happening yet. I do now that someone who lives in LA that is moving here though, b/c they found a great deal.

55 minutes ago, dbmhoosier said:

I think a lot more people will be working remotely for years to come.  I also think NYC is dead.  

I think Manhattan may be in trouble - all of those empty office buildings mean the people who supported all of those workers are also in trouble. The outer boroughs will survive though.

I know that you know the city better than most on here, but too many think NYC is only Manhattan. Manhattan has been a rotting, fetid mess of wealth inequality and chain stores for a long time before COVID. Landlords were doubling and tripling rents, pushing small businesses out and leaving vacant storefronts. It's been a waste of space for years. I see no reason to ever step foot in Manhattan now if I don't have to commute to work.

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In the 70s and 80s people left the big cities. The trend reversed as cities got safer and came back in vogue. Now with crime, high taxes, and lack of amenities, cities are losing people once again. State like IL and NY were already losing residents. NY and San Fran have already seen rents drop by double digits. Chicago is not far behind. Once people start leaving, tax revenue decreases, municipal debt rises, and services suffer accelerating the outflow. It becomes hard to stop. I think mid tier cities like Salt Lake City, Denver, Indy, Nashville, etc will hold up all right as long as they keep crime and taxes down and have good education alternatives. Nashvilles 32% property tax increase won't help. People leaving NY with kids are looking for in person schools and not online learning. 

Sunday night looters caused $60 million in damages in Chicago. https://www.foxnews.com/us/black-lives-matter-holds-rally-chicago-support-arrested-looting-unrest

After being shut down by COVID, then reopening and being looted and vandalized, they recovered only to have it happen again. This will drive many businesses out of the city and or out of business. Insurance isn't paying for all of this and insurance premiums will now skyrocket leaving more of a burden on those still there. Areas damaged in the 60s riots are still recovering 50 years later. The process takes decades and we are seeing it undone in months. 

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43 minutes ago, FritzIam4IU said:

Handshakes could be a thing of the past.

Yup. I was watching a show last night and someone was blowing out birthday candles in a large group of people. Gave me the willies!

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7 minutes ago, Lostin76 said:

I think there will be significant and lasting changes, especially the acceleration of online shopping and working from home. We've both been working remotely since March 13th and it's fine. I have roughly 50 people in my group and we've adjusted well. I just can't imagine wasting time walking to the subway stop and commuting into Manhattan anymore - and then doing the same thing on the way home. It's just a waste of time.

Big chains are fleeing NYC (good riddance!) and we are losing lots of smaller places/independent shops. But, some independently owned restaurants/bars/shops here are flexing to meet this new reality. Not sure if it's enough to keep them going, but life is moving on here in Brooklyn. Is it different? Yeah, but things do change.

I know there are articles about people fleeing the city, but I honestly do not know a single person who is leaving the city permanently. Not a one. Many of us are actually hoping that rents/real estate prices fall - that's not happening yet. I do now that someone who lives in LA that is moving here though, b/c they found a great deal.

I think Manhattan may be in trouble - all of those empty office buildings mean the people who supported all of those workers are also in trouble. The outer boroughs will survive though.

I know that you know the city better than most on here, but too many think NYC is only Manhattan. Manhattan has been a rotting, fetid mess of wealth inequality and chain stores for a long time before COVID. Landlords were doubling and tripling rents, pushing small businesses out and leaving vacant storefronts. It's been a waste of space for years. I see no reason to ever step foot in Manhattan now if I don't have to commute to work.

 I also think it’s likely that we’ll see lasting change in increased telecommuting / working remotely.

when this started in March I dreaded it, didn’t know how our law firm would work effectively remotely (50 person firm). I’ve learned that for the most part, so far, working remotely works well - and I really, really don’t miss an hour and a half commuting back and forth every day, sitting in traffic, fighting traffic. 

Another plus, think of the environmental impact of significantly decreasing commuting and especially in big cities. There are lots of negative economic consequences and I don’t mean to limit those but there are also positives 

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5 minutes ago, Hoosierhoopster said:

 I also think it’s likely that we’ll see lasting change in increased telecommuting / working remotely.

when this started in March I dreaded it, didn’t know how our law firm would work effectively remotely (50 person firm). I’ve learned that for the most part, so far, working remotely works well - and I really, really don’t miss an hour and a half commuting back and forth every day, sitting in traffic, fighting traffic. 

Another plus, think of the environmental impact of significantly decreasing commuting and especially in big cities. There are lots of negative economic consequences and I don’t mean to limit those but there are also positives 

I REALLY don't miss my commute - especially in the summer. Was not fun to be standing in a hot subway after a 10 minutes walk to our stop. There were some days when I would be practically be sweating through my suit before even getting on the sub.

And yeah, the environmental impact could be one silver lining to all of this.

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18 minutes ago, Lostin76 said:

Yup. I was watching a show last night and someone was blowing out birthday candles in a large group of people. Gave me the willies!

I have an accountant friend who was saying one of the "silver linings" of this whole COVID nightmare is that handshakes would be a thing of the past...he hated having to shake everyones hand all the time ha.

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12 minutes ago, Lostin76 said:

I REALLY don't miss my commute - especially in the summer. Was not fun to be standing in a hot subway after a 10 minutes walk to our stop. There were some days when I would be practically be sweating through my suit before even getting on the sub.

That's one of the things I do miss...the commute...

Me, a 30 oz Yeti full of Peet's Cafe Domingo, in that sneaky Maxima rolling down 59 with the trucks (no kidding, I am very much in the minority driving a car on Texas freeways) with "Let it Bleed" blaring was how I got ready for my day...Heaven...

Now it's just me and the coffee...☹️

Oh, and my wife coming mid-morning into my home office and saying, "oh for God's sake calm down." 

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22 minutes ago, IUFLA said:

That's one of the things I do miss...the commute...

Me, a 30 oz Yeti full of Peet's Cafe Domingo, in that sneaky Maxima rolling down 59 with the trucks (no kidding, I am very much in the minority driving a car on Texas freeways) with "Let it Bleed" blaring was how I got ready for my day...Heaven...

Now it's just me and the coffee...☹️

Oh, and my wife coming mid-morning into my home office and saying, "oh for God's sake calm down." 

I love literally everything about this post.

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I am totally fine getting rid of handshakes.  I find it awkward.  I have gorilla grip strength so I either come in too soft or I crush bones and nobody likes either.  Also I dont trust other people's hygiene.

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4 minutes ago, mrflynn03 said:

I am totally fine getting rid of handshakes.  I find it awkward.  I have gorilla grip strength so I either come in too soft or I crush bones and nobody likes either.  Also I dont trust other people's hygiene.

i'd lobby for the Kid N Play foot tap. 

...or at the very minimum a bow and fist bump. 

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2 hours ago, Seeking6 said:

I can only give a couple examples.

Downtown Indy will probably snap back quicker than most large cities because of convention business and honestly....we've spent decades to get this city where it's at. Right now though you have panhandlers, addicts, homeless all walking around. I don't go downtown Indy anymore until this nonsense ends.

Regarding a city like Chicago. Very good friend from IU is commercial real estate broker for one of the big boys. He's expecting by end of the year at least 1/3 of jobs (at his employer)  lost because so many businesses are either forcing their way out of leases, not paying, cancelling altogether,etc....I haven't lived there in decades but will always have a love for Chicago. I'm very nervous what's ahead for them. 

The several years prior to 2020, despite being based in Louisville I worked approximately 25% of my time in downtown Chicago.  Have not been to Chicago since February, or for that matter, I've not been in the office in Louisville since March.  When things settle down, I envision a world where I only go into the office in Louisville when necessary, and my trips to Chicago may be limited to once or twice per year.

Both cities have been ravaged, not only because of Covid, but because of social unrest.  The amount if crime in Louisville right now is unprecedented.  It literally went from being one of the safest cities in the U.S. to one of the most dangerous, seemingly overnight.  

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It happened mostly by accident for me but have pretty much shifted to online or local for everything including groceries.  And I can buy in bulk online, just the other day ordered a year supply of plastic forks for $4.  Get much better quality food at good prices.  At first when everything closed down there was nowhere to really go.  I got used to hanging around close to home and found more local sources for good quality proteins and had already had organic produce shipped to the house every 2 weeks.  Other than work I have only been further than 20 miles from home 1 time this year.  Its great.  And with what is going on in the big cities there is no way I am visiting any of them anytime soon.

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