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11 minutes ago, IUFLA said:

 

So do either of you think the government will ever assume the responsibility for restricting what an individual eats?

Would either of you be ok with that?

We can't even feed everyone...much less regulate their food. Plus too many lobbyist would shut that down that work in the food industries.

Problem would be is any measure/attempt taken by the government would disproportionately effect the poor. They have the least amount of income and options for choosing healthy foods. The unhealthy stuff in the store is already prepared/cheap/easy to eat. Sadly inflation effects the unprepared food/staples more than the prepared food so it's getting worse right now. When you don't have a parent at home to make you dinner it's no wonder kids eat what they do and those habits perpetuate. When mama is working two jobs to make ends meet no one is there too know how to prepare a healthy meal. It would be nice if we could build some type of program to have farmers excess and unwanted crops (see so many deformed fruits and vegetables thrown away because it can't be sold at the grocery store) to be delivered to the hungry/needy in food pantries, sent to places that do donational meal deliveries and/or have another meal that can be taken home after school by needy kids. I'd much rather my tax dollars go to that then spent overseas or before the farmers get subsides they have to provide proof of donating any salvaged crops etc. Whatever the case someone smarter than me should be able to figure it out in a way that makes sense. There is a lot of waste and abuse and things that I particularly don't want to pay for but that is one I can get behind.

I remember when I first got out of college I worked for a pharmacy chain and you would see these kids come in 8-9 years old with no parents...go to the snack section and buy a bunch of junk food with their mom's ebt card. You'd ask where their mother is and they would say passed out on the couch. There are a lot of social safety net's in the country that are well intentioned....but actually exasperate the problems unfortunately....but that is a whole can of worms.

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2 hours ago, HoosierFaithful said:

Definitely seems like we're past the worst of Delta.  Thank God.

Also entirely agree, obesity in this country is unreal.  That's not a shocking statement, I know, but I'm soon to be married to a nutritionist and I've learned more than I care to about nutrition.  So much of what we're taught growing up, the cooking habits we grow into, and what mass media shows as normal is... really bad for our bodies.

An early CONGRATULATIONS to you ! Just let her know its still ok to meet up with the occasional HSN member passing through town for a beer :cheers:

48 minutes ago, tdhoosier said:

My wife had a script for a patient and the doctor asked to remind the patient about the importance of healthy eating when trying to lose weight. When my wife brought it up, the patient she was trying to eat healthy, and was proud about her dinner decision the previous night: a Stouffer's microwave lasagna dinner. 🤦‍♂️

I couldn't believe it. My wife said I'd be surprised at how many people think if you're not eating candy or fast food then you must be eating healthy. 

I like Stouffers microwave lasagna!

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33 minutes ago, IUFLA said:

 

So do either of you think the government will ever assume the responsibility for restricting what an individual eats?

Would either of you be ok with that?

Restricting? no. Taxing? I don't think that would get to the root of the problem. Educating? yes, but people have made it clear in this pandemic that they don't want to be told what to do, even if it's only a recommendation. 

Here's the thing about health: i'm all for people making their own choices, but you can't deny that our overall unhealthy culture effects our personal pocket books by way of health insurance premiums and overall healthcare costs. Healthy people subsidize the unhealthy. 

I think nutritional education is needed (case and point above), but not to get too political, Michele Obama got blasted by the other side for having a freaking garden at the white house and trying to introduce healthier choices to school lunch programs. Somehow, we need to find a way in this country to get behind a cohesive plan for healthy living that's of the size, scope and has the urgency of the moon landing. This not only includes exercise and nutritional education, but also reforming the health care system into a prevention program (not only a treatment program). 

And this is all a pipe dream because a) we can't seem to let any political party have a 'win' these days. The name of the game is obstruct, cast blame and throw poop. (I truly am pointing fingers at both sides) And b) the food lobby (and pharmaceutical lobby) is pretty damn powerful and will fight hard to block any legislation that gets in the way of their interests of making money. 

Sorry to be pessimistic. And sorry if that got too political....if it was you can blame @IUFLA for baiting me. 😎 

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1 minute ago, Reacher said:

An early CONGRATULATIONS to you ! Just let her know its still ok to meet up with the occasional HSN member passing through town for a beer :cheers:

I like Stouffers microwave lasagna!

Me too, but the point is, we don't consider it a healthy meal! haha.

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1 minute ago, Reacher said:

An early CONGRATULATIONS to you ! Just let her know its still ok to meet up with the occasional HSN member passing through town for a beer :cheers:

I like Stouffers microwave lasagna!

lol...with the diet I'm on....omg my wife makes the best Lasagna.... that sounds so dang good right now!! Haven't had pasta in 3 months!  FYI she loves the diet...not only because I'm slimming down and hopefully looking a little better lol but mostly because she basically has had no reason to cook anymore lol.

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22 minutes ago, dgambill said:

Problem would be is any measure/attempt taken by the government would disproportionately effect the poor. They have the least amount of income and options for choosing healthy foods. The unhealthy stuff in the store is already prepared/cheap/easy to eat.

Yeah, I think you pretty much nailed it there. 

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In olden days, fat people were pegged as wealthy (i.e., they had the disposable income for extra food), but to be honest, I would welcome some pretty hard push to get me in shape.  I don't know what form that would take as financial incentives wouldn't do it for me at all...I'm literally addicted to good food and would pay what was necessary, within reason, to get it.

If anyone has any out of the box creative thinking on incentives, I'm about 45 pounds over where I need to be right now (not the root cause, but this was definitely aggravated by the pandemic) and 10 years ago when I was running 10Ks, I was 65 pounds lighter and had really excellent endurance.  I wouldn't classify myself as high risk, but I'm definitely headed that way, but the mental block to reverse course is just huge.  I'd welcome some creative motivational ideas, because short of my wife telling me she was leaving me, I'm not sure what gets me back on the wagon.

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Honestly, the best thing I ever did was stop treating a diet as an absolute.  I went from a standard meat and potatoes guy to a recreational vegan (vegan meals 50-60% of the time) by substituting single meals.  I tried once to go vegan cold turkey (har har), I cracked in 3 days.  I'll eat mostly vegetables and produce for one day and then the next day, if I'm craving BBQ, I'm hitting up my local BBQ joint.  I feel more in control of my diet.

The second thing I'd say: get someone who knows how to cook healthy meals to show you.  I'm lucky that I'm marrying one, which gives me a big leg up.  

The old saying of 90% in the kitchen, 10% in the gym is pretty accurate.  

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18 minutes ago, FKIM01 said:

In olden days, fat people were pegged as wealthy (i.e., they had the disposable income for extra food), but to be honest, I would welcome some pretty hard push to get me in shape.  I don't know what form that would take as financial incentives wouldn't do it for me at all...I'm literally addicted to good food and would pay what was necessary, within reason, to get it.

If anyone has any out of the box creative thinking on incentives, I'm about 45 pounds over where I need to be right now (not the root cause, but this was definitely aggravated by the pandemic) and 10 years ago when I was running 10Ks, I was 65 pounds lighter and had really excellent endurance.  I wouldn't classify myself as high risk, but I'm definitely headed that way, but the mental block to reverse course is just huge.  I'd welcome some creative motivational ideas, because short of my wife telling me she was leaving me, I'm not sure what gets me back on the wagon.

Some friends have a Saturday cheat day....so they can indulge in the foods they love on that day, but make smarter choices the rest of the week. I think overall, it just comes down to how bad you want it. The appeal of incentives will eventually wear out. 

The key for me is trying to convince myself that I feel better when I workout and eat right. And for the most part I do feel better. I definitely sleep better and I don't torture my stomach. I personally can't do fad diets, 30 day challenges, etc. For me, it's all about eating healthy 80% of the time and indulging when I need to and no more than 20% of the time (most of that being alcohol...haha). Sometimes I slip, but for the most part, I've been able to pull myself back to that ratio. I also find workout programs that I enjoy...and I mix those programs up every 6-8 weeks so I don't plateau or become bored. 

Good luck to you. The hardest step is getting started. 

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48 minutes ago, FKIM01 said:

In olden days, fat people were pegged as wealthy (i.e., they had the disposable income for extra food), but to be honest, I would welcome some pretty hard push to get me in shape.  I don't know what form that would take as financial incentives wouldn't do it for me at all...I'm literally addicted to good food and would pay what was necessary, within reason, to get it.

If anyone has any out of the box creative thinking on incentives, I'm about 45 pounds over where I need to be right now (not the root cause, but this was definitely aggravated by the pandemic) and 10 years ago when I was running 10Ks, I was 65 pounds lighter and had really excellent endurance.  I wouldn't classify myself as high risk, but I'm definitely headed that way, but the mental block to reverse course is just huge.  I'd welcome some creative motivational ideas, because short of my wife telling me she was leaving me, I'm not sure what gets me back on the wagon.

I knew a guy years ago that had a huge belly. He attributed it to decades of steak dinners!

I fight the weight loss battle constantly. Right now I'm 5 pounds heavier than where I've been most of the last 10 years. Heading into winter, that is not ideal. I don't want to have to get my suits taken out! Going out to eat is a big part of the problem. At some point, my wife and I have to start splitting entrees instead of getting our own. I'll probably get an exercise bike for the winter to keep my activity up.  But, like what @HoosierFaithful said, it is diet that is most important. When I see my weight climbing, I make a conscious effort to cut out / cut back on portions, meals, snacks and so far that has sufficed.

As far as a motivational idea, I'd try to find someone with your same predicament and find small ways to keep motivated.

When I started in my career, my buddy and I would bet Dairy Queen on who had the best week. Friday afternoons the loser would buy. That $5/ week did more to boost my sales, and income, than any motivational speaker, professional sales ideas, etc ever could. Simple but effective- as well as a way to eat Dairy Queen every week, lol

Check out the weight loss thread as well.

In your case, lets say your wife was your weight loss buddy. You could make it that you got a splurge meal every week you lost 1 pound or more. 

 

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45 minutes ago, FKIM01 said:

In olden days, fat people were pegged as wealthy (i.e., they had the disposable income for extra food), but to be honest, I would welcome some pretty hard push to get me in shape.  I don't know what form that would take as financial incentives wouldn't do it for me at all...I'm literally addicted to good food and would pay what was necessary, within reason, to get it.

If anyone has any out of the box creative thinking on incentives, I'm about 45 pounds over where I need to be right now (not the root cause, but this was definitely aggravated by the pandemic) and 10 years ago when I was running 10Ks, I was 65 pounds lighter and had really excellent endurance.  I wouldn't classify myself as high risk, but I'm definitely headed that way, but the mental block to reverse course is just huge.  I'd welcome some creative motivational ideas, because short of my wife telling me she was leaving me, I'm not sure what gets me back on the wagon.

I'm being serious as I was just at the funeral of someone only 3 years older than me. 

Go to a viewing of someone around your age. At least for me, really put things in perspective.  

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Something I think that is overlooked in the food most people eat is almost everything has sugar or some derivative added in it. Anything that ends in the suffix -ose, or things like maltodextrin which you would never know is a corn syrup solid is sugar.

It is meant to be addictive and trigger a dopamine response to keep you coming back. 

I cut out sugar several years ago and it was the hardest thing I've ever had to quit. Considering what else I've had to quit I think that says alot. 

I can't even stand to eat a Hershey nugget anymore. 

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2 hours ago, tdhoosier said:

i'm all for people making their own choices, but you can't deny that our overall unhealthy culture effects our personal pocket books by way of health insurance premiums and overall healthcare costs. Healthy people subsidize the unhealthy. 

That's very true, and I would say we all have some unhealthy choices in our lifestyle...Everyone...I subsidize people who use drugs, smoke, abuse the welfare system, and make bad personal decisions every day...And that's ok...

I just wondered if we're getting to the point yet where we're willing to give up personal freedoms without being rational about it...I'm a live and let live guy...What I, personally, do doesn't color my thoughts on other people for the most part...as long as it's it's legal...

3 hours ago, tdhoosier said:

I think nutritional education is needed (case and point above), but not to get too political, Michele Obama got blasted by the other side for having a freaking garden at the white house and trying to introduce healthier choices to school lunch programs. Somehow, we need to find a way in this country to get behind a cohesive plan for healthy living that's of the size, scope and has the urgency of the moon landing. This not only includes exercise and nutritional education, but also reforming the health care system into a prevention program (not only a treatment program). 

You know, healthy eating information (or at least what was thought to be healthy eating information) has been with us since I was in grade school...You learned what (at the time) the healthy foods were thought to be. The cafeteria in my school served food dictated by government guidelines...So it's nothing new...A lot discoveries in what's good versus what's unhealthy have been made, but overall basis for the food pyramid is older than I am... As science has changed, so has the information to the public...But I remember being taught the "Basic 7" around 3rd grade or so...Shoot, eggs at one time were thought to be the unhealthiest food on the planet (where do you think we got Egg Beaters from? I was always hoping they stick to the naming convention when they replaced breakfast meats as well, but, sadly, they didn't 😁 )...

Live and let lives, brothers...

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https://www.cnn.com/2021/09/21/health/us-coronavirus-tuesday/index.html

The average rate of Covid-19 deaths in the 10 least vaccinated states was more than four times higher over the past week than the rate in the 10 most vaccinated states, according to a CNN analysis.

In the least vaccinated states, roughly eight people out of every 100,000 residents died of Covid-19 over the past week, compared with only about two out of every 100,000 people in the 10 most vaccinated states.
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6 hours ago, FKIM01 said:

In olden days, fat people were pegged as wealthy (i.e., they had the disposable income for extra food), but to be honest, I would welcome some pretty hard push to get me in shape.  I don't know what form that would take as financial incentives wouldn't do it for me at all...I'm literally addicted to good food and would pay what was necessary, within reason, to get it.

If anyone has any out of the box creative thinking on incentives, I'm about 45 pounds over where I need to be right now (not the root cause, but this was definitely aggravated by the pandemic) and 10 years ago when I was running 10Ks, I was 65 pounds lighter and had really excellent endurance.  I wouldn't classify myself as high risk, but I'm definitely headed that way, but the mental block to reverse course is just huge.  I'd welcome some creative motivational ideas, because short of my wife telling me she was leaving me, I'm not sure what gets me back on the wagon.

I've been listening to a lot of podcasts while I've been walking my dog lately, and one I heard a couple days ago was talking about mindset. It said changing a couple words can make a huge difference. Instead of saying you can't have something, say you don't have something.

I never thought about it, but it makes so much sense. About 7 years ago I gave up pop for new years because a few of my students did it and they wanted me to join them. At first it was, "I can't have pop," and it was really tough. I haven't had one since, and now "I don't have pop," and I don't even think about it.

Instead of "I can eat healthy," change it to "I do eat healthy." I'm in the same boat as you, so this coming weekend, I'm going to go through my kitchen and getting rid of anything unhealthy. Also going to try to plan my meals. A lot of my family has struggled with obesity and unhealthy eating over the years, so it is something that is really tough for me to kick.

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11 hours ago, Leathernecks said:

I've been listening to a lot of podcasts while I've been walking my dog lately, and one I heard a couple days ago was talking about mindset. It said changing a couple words can make a huge difference. Instead of saying you can't have something, say you don't have something.

I never thought about it, but it makes so much sense. About 7 years ago I gave up pop for new years because a few of my students did it and they wanted me to join them. At first it was, "I can't have pop," and it was really tough. I haven't had one since, and now "I don't have pop," and I don't even think about it.

Instead of "I can eat healthy," change it to "I do eat healthy." I'm in the same boat as you, so this coming weekend, I'm going to go through my kitchen and getting rid of anything unhealthy. Also going to try to plan my meals. A lot of my family has struggled with obesity and unhealthy eating over the years, so it is something that is really tough for me to kick.

Just curious, have you come across The Game Changer Life? It's a podcast by Dave Anderson who wrote "The Intentional Mindset." I'm about half way through the book and picked it up because it was recommended by coaching colleagues. As I looked into is more, I found out that it's the book that Rob Phinessee read this offseason in an effort to develop his killer instinct. And then, I listened to the Tom Crean interview on Hoosier Hysterics and he was raving about it. So far there's a whole bunch of great insights in the book (similar to your example above) that I can definitely apply to myself and preach to my athletes. 

Similar to what you said and kind of like i mentioned to @FKIM01, you need to almost change the way you think about things. Rather than think, "i'm missing my favorite foods" (a negative).....you need to think "healthy foods make me feel better" (a positive). It sounds almost too simple and a bit corny, but it helps me. Another great thing I've taken away from the book and speak to my swimmers about is that "progress begins at the end of your comfort zone". Once an athlete can realize this, discomfort is welcomed because they attach the sensation to improvement (a positive) instead of pain or fear (a negative). This has lead to focused and intense practices. 

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17 hours ago, FKIM01 said:

In olden days, fat people were pegged as wealthy (i.e., they had the disposable income for extra food), but to be honest, I would welcome some pretty hard push to get me in shape.  I don't know what form that would take as financial incentives wouldn't do it for me at all...I'm literally addicted to good food and would pay what was necessary, within reason, to get it.

If anyone has any out of the box creative thinking on incentives, I'm about 45 pounds over where I need to be right now (not the root cause, but this was definitely aggravated by the pandemic) and 10 years ago when I was running 10Ks, I was 65 pounds lighter and had really excellent endurance.  I wouldn't classify myself as high risk, but I'm definitely headed that way, but the mental block to reverse course is just huge.  I'd welcome some creative motivational ideas, because short of my wife telling me she was leaving me, I'm not sure what gets me back on the wagon.

I'm no expert...no nutritionist...not super healthy (which is why I started mine). I do think it is all mind over matter. It's a huge sacrifice for sure! You are going to likely give up your favorite foods/snacks most likely. I'll just tell you what has been working for me. Everyone is different...and I know there will be people on this board that knows way more about nutrition etc that will probably even say what I'm doing is wrong or not the best way. I'll try to keep it pithy...but anyone not interested just skip my post because it will probably be lengthy. I've lost 38 lbs in about 6 months with just limited exercise (riding bike a few days of the week and lifting weights a couple days of the week...occcassional pickleball game here and there) I do have a 2 1/2 year old so I do chase, play, carry, wrestle, take swimming etc. Basically I went more keto friendly diet.

1. I stopped drinking any drinks with sugar. Coke gone :( , sweet tea, lemonade....switch to diet tea, 1 diet mt dew, water with mio. Did that a year ago and lost 10lbs in about a month alone....but it crept back on over time because of my other habits. Then just went all in on it.

2. No added sugar. No candy, cookies, ice cream, sweets. (subbed low carb yogurt, fresh fruit, sugar free jell-o, and occassional no sugar added fruit popcicle) Atkins has some pretty good snack/treat substitutes as well for a treat

3. No chips (subbed bbq pork rinds, nuts, and occassional 100 cal popcorn pack)

4. Limit bread (I couldn't eliminate it but switched to Sola Bread/Buns for sandwiches/burgers and low carb tortillas for wraps) subbed pork panko for breadcrumbs (yummy), no other breads rolls/muffins/cake (they do make some coconut/almond flour stuff but I hate it)

5. No pasta :(  (they do make miracle noodles/rice etc...it isn't great but if you dress it up good it's edible...just put in a frying pan and bake off the excess water first)

6. Eat smaller meals. Just smaller portions and would then allow myself to have a snack between. Big meals made me lethargic but allowed to eat a quick snack if I got hungry later. Eventually I didn't need to eat snacks as my stomach and brain adjusted to the smaller meals.

7. Don't eat after 7pm

8. Do reward yourself...enjoy special occassions/a trip out...maybe you can still have that one or two things but in smaller quantity (lunch size portion/small slice of cake or one cupcake for birthday etc)

That's basically it. Checked carbs on everything and wasn't trying to be carb free but just cut my daily limit in half or more. Try to cut almost all out during breakfast and lunch and save a little carbs for my dinner (just would have a very small helping of that item if I did have carbs). First week sucked...then it got a little easier. I basically looked at it like a competition. Me against the food and about trying to lose weight/inches. Progress made it easier to not cheat on it because of how hard I worked all week then I didn't even want to cheat on weekends etc. This worked for me. Remember to really enjoy the foods you can have. Delicious steak, seafood/salmon, cheese, hot wings (one's with no sugar in sauce) Might not even be the healthiest way to lose the weight but my blood pressure came down as did my cholesterol levels and in general I don't feel bloated and tired. Might be easier to ease into it I'm not sure. I just decided to attack it. My wife helped a lot. Encouraged by making keto friendly foods and recipes...and by telling me how good I look etc. Positive reinforcement helps a lot for me. Sometimes you have to try a couple different things to get something you like. Took me trying several different brands of Pork Rinds before I found one I loved. Same with bread although I don't mind just doing a wrap or just going straight egg and sausage and no biscuit. Find some go to snacks like jerky and cheese sticks or something. That's the route I took. I'm sure it isn't the best well balanced etc and somethings that are carb light are still bad so you may have to cut out salt etc in some other areas. Overall I do think its more mental. Just cutting out the excuses and being disciplined and telling myself the cookie isn't worth it. I don't even want that cookie my brain just wants the sugar. Then finding an alternative. Can be so difficult to start. Especially if you have a house full of junk...it will be calling your name...but I put all my food in a different cupboard and don't even open the other one now when I want something for myself...only when I'm getting something out for my wife or daughter. It helps if it becomes a family thing and you have a partner sharing the meals. Making your spouse your accountability partner can also just make you resent them...and you don't want that lol. Good luck to anyone on their journey. I'll have to head over to the diet/nutrition thread for more tips/ ideas.

 

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40 minutes ago, tdhoosier said:

Just curious, have you come across The Game Changer Life? It's a podcast by Dave Anderson who wrote "The Intentional Mindset." I'm about half way through the book and picked it up because it was recommended by coaching colleagues. As I looked into is more, I found out that it's the book that Rob Phinessee read this offseason in an effort to develop his killer instinct. And then, I listened to the Tom Crean interview on Hoosier Hysterics and he was raving about it. So far there's a whole bunch of great insights in the book (similar to your example above) that I can definitely apply to myself and preach to my athletes. 

Similar to what you said and kind of like i mentioned to @FKIM01, you need to almost change the way you think about things. Rather than think, "i'm missing my favorite foods" (a negative).....you need to think "healthy foods make me feel better" (a positive). It sounds almost too simple and a bit corny, but it helps me. Another great thing I've taken away from the book and speak to my swimmers about is that "progress begins at the end of your comfort zone". Once an athlete can realize this, discomfort is welcomed because they attach the sensation to improvement (a positive) instead of pain or fear (a negative). This has lead to focused and intense practices. 

I've heard Allen Carr's books are great for stopping drinking, smoking, etc. Never read them but seems they've worked for many people. Maybe someone has an opinion on them.

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16 hours ago, IUFLA said:

You know, healthy eating information (or at least what was thought to be healthy eating information) has been with us since I was in grade school...You learned what (at the time) the healthy foods were thought to be. The cafeteria in my school served food dictated by government guidelines...So it's nothing new...A lot discoveries in what's good versus what's unhealthy have been made, but overall basis for the food pyramid is older than I am... As science has changed, so has the information to the public...But I remember being taught the "Basic 7" around 3rd grade or so...Shoot, eggs at one time were thought to be the unhealthiest food on the planet (where do you think we got Egg Beaters from? I was always hoping they stick to the naming convention when they replaced breakfast meats as well, but, sadly, they didn't 😁 )...

All true. The food pyramid has actually changed quite a bit and now I believe it's a food plate. But beyond that no connection is made to outcomes. IMO, there's not enough focus on the 'why'. For example the correlation to vitamins, fiber, etc. to better immunity or an increase in energy. Why should I eat this and not eat that? 

Plus, and as @mrflynn03 pointed out, there is confusion about ingredients: additives, preservatives, sugar substitutes, etc. There's manipulation in advertising. For example:  "my kids fruit snacks are made with 'real fruit'....they must be healthy!" or " Diet Coke has no calories and no sugar....it must be healthy!"

And then there's good carbs and refined carbs. There's good protein and then there's protein that should be taken in moderation like red meat because it's linked to heart disease. etc. etc. 

It's a lot of information, true, but I definitely didn't learn about this stuff in school. And if I did I was too young to care. I'm not saying I have an answer because I definitely don't. And I'm not trying to shove it down anybody's throats, I'm just making the point that our country greatly lacks true nutritional education. Heck, i'm not even completely confident I know what i'm talking about. 

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I think I said a few pages back but I'll say it again. I think our country missed the mark by not telling everyone your best defense vs this virus or any virus is a strong immune system. Exercise, healthy eating,etc...should have been pounded down to us in the Spring of 2020.

I've known of 6 people who have died from Covid here in Indy area either directly knowing them or friends of friends. Ages from 30's to 60's. One thing all had in common was extra weight or in 2 instances just obese. 

Love hearing people talk about eating better, getting exercise. Carb friendly (minus the Coors Light intake) is the only way I know to successfully lose weight and keep it off. 

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21 minutes ago, tdhoosier said:

All true. The food pyramid has actually changed quite a bit and now I believe it's a food plate. But beyond that no connection is made to outcomes. IMO, there's not enough focus on the 'why'. For example the correlation to vitamins, fiber, etc. to better immunity or an increase in energy. Why should I eat this and not eat that? 

Plus, and as @mrflynn03 pointed out, there is confusion about ingredients: additives, preservatives, sugar substitutes, etc. There's manipulation in advertising. For example:  "my kids fruit snacks are made with 'real fruit'....they must be healthy!" or " Diet Coke has no calories and no sugar....it must be healthy!"

And then there's good carbs and refined carbs. There's good protein and then there's protein that should be taken in moderation like red meat because it's linked to heart disease. etc. etc. 

It's a lot of information, true, but I definitely didn't learn about this stuff in school. And if I did I was too young to care. I'm not saying I have an answer because I definitely don't. And I'm not trying to shove it down anybody's throats, I'm just making the point that our country greatly lacks true nutritional education. Heck, i'm not even completely confident I know what i'm talking about. 

Because every industry...meat, dairy, poultry, grain, corn, etc etc spend a fortune to "muddy up" the science and to ensure their industry/farmers/shareholders don't lose market share/$$. I think in general moderation is probably the key. Less processed foods with preservatives and added sugar etc. I hope once I get down to my target weight to maintain it by simply taking that moderation and more natural approach. Hopefully that more scalpel/precision approach will in the end be my goal to being healthier. Right now I had to take a more drastic bigger cut approach to get weight off quicker. I don't think its necessarily the best approach for long term success but was needed due to what I was seeing going on around me and with my health.

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3 minutes ago, Seeking6 said:

I think I said a few pages back but I'll say it again. I think our country missed the mark by not telling everyone your best defense vs this virus or any virus is a strong immune system. Exercise, healthy eating,etc...should have been pounded down to us in the Spring of 2020.

I've known of 6 people who have died from Covid here in Indy area either directly knowing them or friends of friends. Ages from 30's to 60's. One thing all had in common was extra weight or in 2 instances just obese. 

Love hearing people talk about eating better, getting exercise. Carb friendly (minus the Coors Light intake) is the only way I know to successfully lose weight and keep it off. 

Agreed my friend. Our country is too willing to solve all our problems by just giving us a pill or a shot in this case with Covid. It wasn't til I had to switch doctors who took a total different approach to my health (and explained the darker side effects for long term organ function etc that these medications I was taking could have) and showing me that they were just maintaining for now...but not correcting my issues did I wake up and accept the fact that I have to take responsibility for my own health and make some adjustments if I want to walk my daughter down the aisle some day hopefully really far off lol!!

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27 minutes ago, tdhoosier said:

All true. The food pyramid has actually changed quite a bit and now I believe it's a food plate. But beyond that no connection is made to outcomes. IMO, there's not enough focus on the 'why'. For example the correlation to vitamins, fiber, etc. to better immunity or an increase in energy. Why should I eat this and not eat that? 

Plus, and as @mrflynn03 pointed out, there is confusion about ingredients: additives, preservatives, sugar substitutes, etc. There's manipulation in advertising. For example:  "my kids fruit snacks are made with 'real fruit'....they must be healthy!" or " Diet Coke has no calories and no sugar....it must be healthy!"

And then there's good carbs and refined carbs. There's good protein and then there's protein that should be taken in moderation like red meat because it's linked to heart disease. etc. etc. 

It's a lot of information, true, but I definitely didn't learn about this stuff in school. And if I did I was too young to care. I'm not saying I have an answer because I definitely don't. And I'm not trying to shove it down anybody's throats, I'm just making the point that our country greatly lacks true nutritional education. Heck, i'm not even completely confident I know what i'm talking about. 

I'll just add I think the exercise component is the key. I'm a few pounds over what I should be, but I do cardio works every day, lift weights 3 X a week (not as strong as I use to be but pretty close), work a couple hours on the farm every day. My cardiologist says my ticker is good...I do have high blood pressure, but I've had that for 20 years and control it with medication. So overall in good health.

As far as eating goes, I just watch the portions. I don't go overboard with goodies but I don't deprive myself either. 

I think one of the biggest changes I've seen in eating habits is our penchant for going out for cheap, fast (not to mention for the most part, unhealthy) meals. I read something a while back about eating at home is normally more healthy than eating out and families/individuals  go out a lot more than they did 50 years ago...

We go out 2 to 3 times a week for dinner, but my fish to steak ratio (thanks to my wife) is about 5-1...

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To turn this a little ways back to Covid. I mean there is like almost 300 pages so I can't go back and read them all but is anyone else a little disturbed by the record profits Pfizer and Moderna are making off these vaccines and boosters? https://www.pharmaceutical-technology.com/news/pfizer-second-quarter-revenue/

Don't get me wrong...I'm a capitalist...but it sure would be nice to see them return a lot of these profits back to the American people who helped finance the costs behind developing, testing and then later PROMOTING/MARKETING this drug for them. https://www.healthaffairs.org/do/10.1377/hblog20210512.191448/full/ 

This isn't unusual, and it was absolutely necessary to get these developed in the quickest and most efficient time possible but the US Govt has gone out of it's way to remove any obstacles for these pharmacutical companies....and they are raking in RECORD profits. I don't want it going into just a discretionary fund but rather possibly COVID assistance funds (or for funding COVID related treatments that are going to insurances etc). We are racking up record levels of debt while they are racking up record levels of profits. Don't get me wrong...I'm not asking them to lose money to produce it but why oh why are we the American people who are suffering with job losses, record govt debt, and medical debt not looking at this arrangement and saying hey...it's time to evaluate your role in this society and your sacrifice to give back during this pandemic. It just seems to me that it also would remove questions around and possibly certain incentivizations of forcing more and more boosters and vaccines unnecessarily on the people as well if there was no monitary incentive to do so it might be trusted more. It just seems once again...like the Bank, Airline, and Auto Bail outs..it just seems that once again this pandemic is being put on the backs of the American People once again. I know we all play our part in a society to contribute financially for the betterment but let's just say I've never been a huge fan of Big Pharma....and it makes me kind of queasy to hear these results right now. Especially given all the scandals in the past with big pharma where they've manipulated trials, testing, bribed doctors and pushed unethical distribution of some drugs on the American people. I know I know I sound like Bernie Sanders right now but in this instance I do feel like there is a unique opportunity to right some wrongs and help the American people when we need it most as opposed to another industry bleeding us dry for temp gains.

Edited by dgambill
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59 minutes ago, dgambill said:

To turn this a little ways back to Covid. I mean there is like almost 300 pages so I can't go back and read them all but is anyone else a little disturbed by the record profits Pfizer and Moderna are making off these vaccines and boosters? https://www.pharmaceutical-technology.com/news/pfizer-second-quarter-revenue/

The short answer is no.  I want to keep the incentive for innovation high in light of the Chinese bio-war threat.  If we are going to allocate taxpayer dollars foolishly, I'd rather overpay for defensive medicine research for this threat, because I only see it getting bigger after China has seen the havoc they've created.

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