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1 hour ago, Seeking6 said:

Love that kids have the ability to earn starting today. I also hope IU has cautioned kids that their NIL may not be worth a dime and to not take it personally if some teammates cash in while others learn the hard way it's business as usual.

Staffs are going to have to work overtime on handling the psychological part of this....especially since we are still talking about 18-21 year olds.

I like the NIL as well. They should be able to cash in on their own likeness.

As for the psychology, I think the players are already somewhat conditioned to the open marketplace simply through the recruiting system, where some players get great/numerous scholarship offers and others do not.

It will certainly be interesting to see how this evolves. I like that IU is willing to work with the players to give them every advantage that the can.

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As long as kids are still team first attitude then we should be just fine. Last thing you need is selfish kids who just want to make more money promoting themselves at the expense of their team. IU should be fine. It's reach is far and wide and name brand value is high. I want our kids to take advantage of that....without taking advantage of each other. That could create some ugly locker rooms.

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I'm guessing what we'll see for the most part are players doing influencer deals with companies (ie, promoting products on their social media), players doing local appearances, sponsoring summer camps in their respective sports, and players using their likeness to create things like YouTube channels where you get a rev share on ad clicks from the platform. 

There are literally kids the same age who nobody every heard of making tons of money by building YouTube channels. 

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There will be plenty to keep an eye on. Here's an interesting one. Olivia Dunne is a LSU gymnast. She has 8k twitter followers....but 4 Million on Tik Tok. Can't even imagine the opportunities being presented to her. Of course I have no clue who she is or what she's done to accumulate 4M followers but that sort of presence?? She's a millionaire this week in whatever products she chooses to endorse.

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I hope people around these kids have taught them about taxes because they will have to pay them.  Also heard someone bring up if a kid signed a contract with a company for 2 years but the kid decides to transfer.  Will that player have to repay some of the money by breaking the contract.

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Thought some of you might be interested, I got this last night in my inbox (of note, interesting they point out continuing to support IU instead of just the athlete directly):
 

Dear XXXX,

Tomorrow launches a new and exciting era of intercollegiate athletics for our students and for you as loyal Hoosier supporters, as our students will be allowed to be compensated for the name, image and likeness (NIL). This is a right that all other college students have enjoyed, and I am excited for our student-athletes that they now have this same opportunity. 

In anticipation of this rules change, we have gone to great lengths in recent years to educate our students about their NIL rights through dedicated programming and third-party partnerships with Opendorse and Altius. I am particularly appreciative of the enormous efforts that Senior Associate Athletic Directors Rebecca Pany and Jeremy Gray as well as Director of Social and Digital Media Lynnea Phillips have made to prepare for this new landscape. 
So what does all this mean, and what opportunities will exist for our students and for you? 
These new NIL rights mean that our students will be able to use their name, image and likeness to enter into agreements and be compensated while still preserving their eligibility to compete in intercollegiate athletics. 

Among the types of NIL agreements that they can enter into:
•    Traditional Endorsements + Social Media – They can be paid to endorse a product in any medium, including social media. 
•    Appearances, Autographs + Camps – They can be paid to make appearances, sign autographs, or conduct camps. 
•    In-kind Deals – They can receive “free” product for a photo, autograph, or social media post. 
While this is a seismic shift in the world of intercollegiate athletics, there are still some very important things that you need to know that have not changed.

Among those are: 
•    These new NIL rights do not refer to pay-for-play – Compensation cannot be contingent upon athletic performance as the basis for the deal. 
•    These NIL rights do not allow for compensation to be contingent upon initial or continued enrollment at a particular school. 
•    Your support of the Varsity Club means as much as ever – while you, as donors, will have new opportunities to enter into independent agreements with our student-athletes, your continued support of the Varsity Club remains critical as we provide for the outstanding educational and athletic opportunities for our student-athletes in the same way we always have. 

I invite you to review our IU Athletics NIL Policy, as well as this set of Frequently Asked Questions that may address items that I have not mentioned. If you are interested in connecting with a student-athlete about an opportunity beginning tomorrow, the FAQ highlights different ways that you can make direct contact with them. 
As always, thank you for your continued support of our student-athletes and IU Athletics as we collectively move into this new era! 
Go IU! 
   
Scott Dolson
Vice President and Director of Intercollegiate Athletics

  

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2 hours ago, BGleas said:

I'm guessing what we'll see for the most part are players doing influencer deals with companies (ie, promoting products on their social media), players doing local appearances, sponsoring summer camps in their respective sports, and players using their likeness to create things like YouTube channels where you get a rev share on ad clicks from the platform. 

There are literally kids the same age who nobody every heard of making tons of money by building YouTube channels. 

Totally agree I can also see kids creating a twitch account and making money off of them streaming playing call of duty, madden, etc. also now on the college basketball games they can now have their name on the back. Etc

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16 minutes ago, IUfaninIllinois said:

Totally agree I can also see kids creating a twitch account and making money off of them streaming playing call of duty, madden, etc. also now on the college basketball games they can now have their name on the back. Etc

Absolutely! I'm connected with the director or marketing for Twitch on twitter and LinkedIn, and he literally just posted on LinkedIn about NIL and athletes using Twitch. That will be a big platform for these kids. 

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5 minutes ago, mrflynn03 said:

Fine by me. I think alot of these kids will find out their likeness isn't as valuable as they thought and may push them to work harder. 

I'm not saying it will ever go this far but could you imagine the loot Watford would have made after his shot just by charging $100 for a shot out to Hoosier fans using Cameo? The real time stuff is going to be amazing and maddening to track over the course of a season. End of the day though. They win and play well....more $. They lose and don't.....people will be less likely to spend $. 

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2 hours ago, IUfaninIllinois said:

Totally agree I can also see kids creating a twitch account and making money off of them streaming playing call of duty, madden, etc. also now on the college basketball games they can now have their name on the back. Etc

Someone mentioned a female gymnast - big opportunity for some of them on OnlyFans lol

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On 6/30/2021 at 9:38 AM, tdhoosier said:

Thanks @IUfaninIllinois for starting the thread. I enjoy talking about this topic because it’s really interesting. 

To answer the question (with speculation), Nike is still a company that needs to make smart business decisions. They have a board of directors to answer to, CEOs and owners can’t just do whatever they want. A market value will be established and companies won’t be frivolous paying over that value in order to secure a recruit for one executive’s allegiance to a certain program. Based on the scenario you painted above, why doesn’t Michael Jordan offer huge, over valued endorsement contracts to secure free agents in Charlotte? 

A company uses marketing to make money from a specific endorsement, not break even….or lose it. Further more, how is Michigan or UCLA going to feel about MJ and Jumpman steering recruits to UNC? They’re endorsed by Jumpman too. Playing favorites could put those sponsorships in jeopardy…..and these college sponsorships are way more valuable to Jordan than a recruit who may only stay at UNC for a year. 

Water will find it’s level. 

I suspect you're right when you're talking about profit seeking companies - endorsements will spread to the big schools and they will be on roughly equivalent footing with each other, though at enormous advantage over the non-big schools. But, what about non-profit seeking money? I believe Knight has given on the order of a billion dollars of his own money to the school. What's to stop him from funneling that money through some non-Nike entity, say a website for Oregon fans that has no realistic chance of making money, and having it pay every Oregon player a million bucks? I'm assuming that the primary motive for his donation is making Oregon win (and if that statement doesn't apply strictly to Knight, it certainly does to countless other boosters), seems that giving players cash is the efficient way to do that. My guess is that legitimate businesses trying to profit off a relationship with a player will be small potatoes compared to money that is essentially a donation to help a team win. 

Edited by HoosierDom
typo
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33 minutes ago, HoosierDom said:

I suspect you're right when you're talking about profit seeking companies - endorsements will spread to the big schools and they will be on roughly equivalent footing with each other, though at enormous advantage over the non-big schools. But, what about non-profit seeking money? I believe Knight has given on the order of a billion dollars of his own money to the school. What's to stop him from funneling that money through some non-Nike entity, say a website for Oregon fans that has no realistic chance of making money, and having it pay every Oregon player a million bucks? I'm assuming that the primary motive for his donation is making Oregon win (and if that statement doesn't apply strictly to Knight, it certainly does to countless other boosters), seems that giving players cash is the efficient way to do that. My guess is that legitimate businesses trying to profit off a relationship with a player will be small potatoes compared to money that is essentially a donation to help a team win. 

I’m not sure I’m following. A couple of things though:

-Donations have been made to schools; the NIL won’t change that. 

-Per the NIL rules in place, there has to be a quid pro quo. Money needs to be exchanged for a service. 

-Players can’t accept money/gifts for nothing or as a donation. They simply can’t be ‘given’ money. 

Are you suggesting donated money being filtered through a non for profit shell company that doesn’t offer any products or services to pay athletes for an endorsement? I’m not sure that would be legal; that sounds like money laundering. Essentially Knight would pay athletes indirectly for a non existent service? Technically that would be a donation, which again, is against the NIL rules.

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5 hours ago, IU Scott said:

I hope people around these kids have taught them about taxes because they will have to pay them.  Also heard someone bring up if a kid signed a contract with a company for 2 years but the kid decides to transfer.  Will that player have to repay some of the money by breaking the contract.

"These NIL rights do not allow for compensation to be contingent upon initial or continued enrollment at a particular school. "

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