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Picture of Ayden celebrating his last day of Elementary school.  For those of you that have been around here long enough know that at 2 or 3 years old doctors were telling us that if Ayden survived he

Yesterday we were so.bleseed to celebrate the graduation of my oldest son from college.  He graduated in 3 years,  played baseball and graduated with honors. 3.75 GPA and starts Grad school to become

I am negative for covid. Thanks for the well wishes. Whatever I had kicked my butt worse than any flu I have ever had. But no covid!

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18 hours ago, 5fouls said:

There appears to be a relationship to a county's positivity rate and its proximity to Michigan.  

Hover over the counties on the map.

https://www.coronavirus.in.gov/

I have been in LaGrange county the past couple of days.  Are there any Amish "metrics" out there?

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22 hours ago, 5fouls said:

I'm a big reader.  A few years ago, I read Ken Follet's 'World Without End'.  Now, it was a work of fiction, but it was a deeply researched historical piece.  One of the main storylines in the book was the town, and the world around it, dealing with the Plague. I'm trying to relate what happened in that time to what we are going through now with Covid.  One thing that strikes me is that, even with no modern advances in medicines available, and amid unsanitary conditions compare to what we have now, many people. even those within the same household, did not get sick and did not die.  

I bring that up to discuss Natural Immunity,.  Is it inherent in some people without them ever becoming infected?  Or, to have any immunity at all, does someone have to become infected, and simply be lucky enough to have the ability to fight it off with few or no impacts? 

It's hard for me to imagine at this point that 90% or more of the world's population has not been exposed to the virus at some point.  Just like in the middle ages, when the husband caught the plague and died, but the wife didn't, there is no way in the conditions of that time that she was not exposed.  The plague was known to take 5 of the same family, but spare 1 or 2.  Why?

    

I quit counting around 30 known exposures.  About 70% of the guys at my firehouse have wound up testing positive.  

There has to be something to it.  My dad as well.  He's on the worship team at church.  Out of 7 or 8 people, everyone got covid except my dad.  

I don't think I have a great immune system by any means.  I don't get great sleep.  I eat generally healthy.  Same for my dad.  

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On 4/30/2021 at 10:16 AM, 5fouls said:

I'm a big reader.  A few years ago, I read Ken Follet's 'World Without End'.  Now, it was a work of fiction, but it was a deeply researched historical piece.  One of the main storylines in the book was the town, and the world around it, dealing with the Plague. I'm trying to relate what happened in that time to what we are going through now with Covid.  One thing that strikes me is that, even with no modern advances in medicines available, and amid unsanitary conditions compare to what we have now, many people. even those within the same household, did not get sick and did not die.  

I bring that up to discuss Natural Immunity,.  Is it inherent in some people without them ever becoming infected?  Or, to have any immunity at all, does someone have to become infected, and simply be lucky enough to have the ability to fight it off with few or no impacts? 

It's hard for me to imagine at this point that 90% or more of the world's population has not been exposed to the virus at some point.  Just like in the middle ages, when the husband caught the plague and died, but the wife didn't, there is no way in the conditions of that time that she was not exposed.  The plague was known to take 5 of the same family, but spare 1 or 2.  Why?

    

I have seen where T Cell immunity could be as high as 70%. Wish I could have been tested for that before being vaccinated. If lots already have immunity, vaccines could be given to those most in need first. Just like a strong immune system can prevent the flu, it only makes sense that either natural immunity and / or a strong immune system can fight off covid.

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I get an email for every delay/issue at every airport every day...

You wouldn't believe the number of people who got booted for not complying with the mask mandate and thereby delaying their flight this weekend...

8 people alone on a single flight out of Houston Hobby airport...Incredible...

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2 hours ago, IUFLA said:

I get an email for every delay/issue at every airport every day...

You wouldn't believe the number of people who got booted for not complying with the mask mandate and thereby delaying their flight this weekend...

8 people alone on a single flight out of Houston Hobby airport...Incredible...

I'm okay with the mask mandate until the world has better control over Covid.  I also understand that other people may disagree with it. 

What I don't get is why people have to fight it and flaunt the fact that they are fighting it.  If I go to a store that requires shoes, I'm not strutting in there barefoot just to make a point.  Given what the world has been going through, why would we fight a mask mandate harder than we would the No shoes, No shirt, No service rule?  

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8 minutes ago, 5fouls said:

I'm okay with the mask mandate until the world has better control over Covid.  I also understand that other people may disagree with it. 

What I don't get is why people have to fight it and flaunt the fact that they are fighting it.  If I go to a store that requires shoes, I'm not strutting in there barefoot just to make a point.  Given what the world has been going through, why would we fight a mask mandate harder than we would the No shoes, No short, No service rule?  

If you've watched any of the videos of people refusing on airplanes or retail stores it's almost comical...

The statement they're trying to make gets obliterated by the "Look, I'm stupid" dialogue... 

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As of Apr 14, IN is #46 in states ranked by % with at least 1 vaccine dose (IN is at 40%). Followed by GA, LA, TN, AL and MS. All states in the same area.  NH leads at 65%. Interesting that KY is not in the bottom 15 with the rest of the states I listed. 

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1 hour ago, 5fouls said:

I'm okay with the mask mandate until the world has better control over Covid.  I also understand that other people may disagree with it. 

What I don't get is why people have to fight it and flaunt the fact that they are fighting it.  If I go to a store that requires shoes, I'm not strutting in there barefoot just to make a point.  Given what the world has been going through, why would we fight a mask mandate harder than we would the No shoes, No short, No service rule?  

My best guess is that covering your mouth and nose (making it slightly harder to breathe) is more invasive to the average person's comfort zone than putting on a shirt or shoes. It's kind of ironic in a way, because I've found that these are often times the kind of people who never miss an opportunity to remind everyone how tough they are and nothing stops them. 

 

Also, treading on thin ice with this one, but federal leadership convinced many Americans that masks weren't cool and were a sign of weakness when this all started. 

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So our company is offering the vaccine on site. Out of several hundred workers they needed 50 to sign up to make it happen. They ended up having to offer it to company insured spouses to make the 50.🤕

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Pro-Vaccination story

https://www.cnn.com/2021/05/04/health/us-coronavirus-tuesday/index.html

Once the US is able to vaccinate more than 70% of its adults, we may finally be able to see a semblance of normalcy, Jha said on Monday.
 
"Case numbers will plummet. We may not be at herd immunity, we'll see little outbreaks here and there but life will begin to really get back to normal," he said.
 
But what if we don't get there?
 
"That's a problem," Jha said. "We're going to be stuck with dealing with this for a long time."
 
"If we just don't vaccinate, then obviously one of the things we've known is we get big outbreaks, you can get more variants," he said. "It's going to be hard to do those large gatherings, indoor concerts, outdoor baseball games, this stuff will get much, much harder if we do not make more progress on vaccinations," he added.
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I'm in the 50-59 age group and have been keeping a close eye on statistics for that range.  During the peak of the pandemic in January, the percentage of total Covid deaths in Indiana that came from that age group was running 4.8-4.9 percent.  As of today, the percentage has increased to 5.2%.  While that may not seem like much, keep in mind that the number of daily deaths in the state has gone down significantly. 

The math says for that to happen, then the percentage of current deaths in that age group must be much higher than that to result in the total percentage to increase like it has.  

So, why are a greater percentage of deaths coming from that what we experienced before?  People can interpret that any way they choose.  From my perspective, I think it's related to vaccinations.  People older than that received their vaccinations first and have done so at a much higher percentage than the 50-59 age group.  Because they've done a good job getting vaccinated, the 60+ age group may no longer be the most vulnerable to Covid.  The virus seems to be finding more vulnerable people in the less-vaccinated 50-59 age group now.

Just my interpretation for that statistical anomaly.

    

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Here is some math to support the above point.  I found stats for the last 90 days in Indiana.

There are currently 12,950 total deaths reported in Indiana attributed to Covid.  1,244 have occurred in the last 90 days, meaning 11,706 had occurred prior to February 4th.

So, taking 5.2% of total deaths as of today means approximately 673 Hoosiers between the ages of 50-59 have died of Covid.  Compare that to 4.9% of the 11,706 deaths prior to February 4th, which calculates to 574.

So, there have been approximately 99 new deaths in the 50-59 date range in the last 90 days from a total death pool of 1,244.  That calculates to 7.95% of deaths in Indiana since Feb 4th have fallen in the 50-59 age range.  

I consider 4.9% prior to Feb 4th compared to 7.95% after February 4th to be significant.  The main change to the environment since that time has been the vaccine, and the 50-59 age group lags behind the 60+ age group in getting vaccinated.

That can't be a coincidence.

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1 hour ago, 5fouls said:

Pro-Vaccination story

https://www.cnn.com/2021/05/04/health/us-coronavirus-tuesday/index.html

Once the US is able to vaccinate more than 70% of its adults, we may finally be able to see a semblance of normalcy, Jha said on Monday.
 
"Case numbers will plummet. We may not be at herd immunity, we'll see little outbreaks here and there but life will begin to really get back to normal," he said.
 
But what if we don't get there?
 
"That's a problem," Jha said. "We're going to be stuck with dealing with this for a long time."
 
"If we just don't vaccinate, then obviously one of the things we've known is we get big outbreaks, you can get more variants," he said. "It's going to be hard to do those large gatherings, indoor concerts, outdoor baseball games, this stuff will get much, much harder if we do not make more progress on vaccinations," he added.

Semblance of normalcy is what we all can agree upon. So far, this is the quickest and most direct path. (unless there is another way I haven't heard about) The only thing I can ask of others is if you are assuming you are a health risk for vaccination please talk to your doctor to confirm this, rather than simply not get vaccinated.  

- To date, VAERS has not detected patterns in cause of death that would indicate a safety problem with COVID-19 vaccines.
- The way the CDC handled the J&J vaccine leads me to believe the CDC is being extra cautious and transparent
- Break through cases (vaccinated people who've actually gotten COVID) is at .008% (see Reacher's link above). .008%!!!
- MRNA vaccines are not new. They have been studied for almost 30 years and are safe.  

 

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Just looked through a lot of the other countries vaccination rates. We are by far leading the world in percentage of population vaccinated and # of people vaccinated. Canada is only at 3% of their population and we're well over 30% and 44% have gotten at least one dose. 

Might be time to stop with the fear mongering and realize the US and its people are absolutely doing what they can. I see nothing wrong with the rates that people are getting the vaccine. It's been a steady incline since late Jan. In the last month alone 14% of the country was vaccinated and we will reach around that number in the coming 30 days, as well. So about 28-30% of the US will have been vaccinated within the last 60 days. 

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1 hour ago, 5fouls said:

Here is some math to support the above point.  I found stats for the last 90 days in Indiana.

There are currently 12,950 total deaths reported in Indiana attributed to Covid.  1,244 have occurred in the last 90 days, meaning 11,706 had occurred prior to February 4th.

So, taking 5.2% of total deaths as of today means approximately 673 Hoosiers between the ages of 50-59 have died of Covid.  Compare that to 4.9% of the 11,706 deaths prior to February 4th, which calculates to 574.

So, there have been approximately 99 new deaths in the 50-59 date range in the last 90 days from a total death pool of 1,244.  That calculates to 7.95% of deaths in Indiana since Feb 4th have fallen in the 50-59 age range.  

I consider 4.9% prior to Feb 4th compared to 7.95% after February 4th to be significant.  The main change to the environment since that time has been the vaccine, and the 50-59 age group lags behind the 60+ age group in getting vaccinated.

That can't be a coincidence.

They told me no math would be involved! 😭

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5 hours ago, btownqb said:

Not saying you guys are fear mongering but there are certainly some who are. 

I don't think anyone is saying we aren't vaccinating quickly - I think we objectively are - but COVID variants don't care how quick we are and don't give participation trophies.  I'm not a doctor, but my understanding is we're in a race against time for a variant that is different enough and/or resistant to the vaccine, which would start this whole process over again.  So we need to go quicker.  And if we can go quicker, we need to go even quicker than that.

We're having conversations about vaccine hesitancy because it's a very real concern and there have been numerous stories over the past weeks about vaccines going unused.  That's notable, IMO.

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